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 Revised Master of Science Program in Telecommunication Engineering

Program Objectives | Admission Requirements |  Degree Plan

Introduction:

The Electrical Engineering (EE) department is the first department at KFUPM to host graduate programs. The department is currently offering degrees of Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in six specializations: Energy, Electromagnetics, Electronics, Control, Communications and Signal Processing. It also offers a Master of Science in Telecommunication Engineering. The number of graduate students constitutes more than 15% of the department student population, the majority of which are international students.

The department has a policy of periodically reviewing its graduate programs in order to guarantee their relevance to the latest and upcoming developments and trends in the field of electrical engineering. The task of revision of the current graduate programs was assigned to the Graduate Program Revision Committee (GPRC). The GPRC comprises representative faculty members from each research group in the department. The committee held regular meetings to discuss various issues related to the revision, and sought continuous input through:

Expertise of the six research groups/specializations in the department.

Survey of a selected set of top American universities that are known of excellence in EE programs.

Consultation of the Industrial Advisory Board (IAB) of the department.

Feedback from graduate students, alumni and employers.

This document presents the revised program for Master of Science in Telecommunication Engineering (M.S.T.E). 

Programs Need Analysis: 

The M.S. in Telecommunication Engineering program has been offered since 2000. The program is still attracting students both from KSA and abroad. They come from reputable universities worldwide, and some of them are part timers who hold prestigious position in international-class companies.

This revision comes out of a routine exercise that KFUPM requires for all programs to ensure currency and continuous compliance with national needs and international standards. The revision resulted in minor changes to the existing structure of course work, adding new courses, deleting obsolete courses, and revising the contents of a large number of existing courses.

The revised program was sent to external and internal reviewers for evaluation. We received four external reviews and four internal reviews. Reviewers' comments were studied and incorporated as appropriate. 

Program Objectives:

The program leading to the degree of Master of Science in Telecommunication Engineering provides an opportunity for the students to pursue advanced studies in this area, and to engage in research.

The specific objectives of the M.S.T.E. program are to:

  • ​Develop an introductory level of competence in conducting research. 
  • Acquaint knowledge on the state-of-the art technologies in telecommunications. 
  • Demonstrate the ability to learn independently and generate new knowledge in their chosen field of study.
  • Become an effective professional engineer in the area of expertise. 
  • Develop leadership, skills and ethics of the profession. 

The program objectives are strongly aligned to the university mission that indicates commitment to "graduating leaders who are knowledgeable, skillful, and productive members of the society" as well as "creating new knowledge". The objectives emphasize competency, self-learning, profession skills, leadership and generating new knowledge.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • ​The graduates of this program should be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes:
  • Master the knowledge of telecommunications engineering concepts. 
  • Conduct research independently and collaboratively. 
  • Formulate problems and plan a procedure for solution. 
  • Communicate, organize and present information effectively. 
  • Pursue advanced graduate studies and lifelong learning. 
  • Realize the relevance of economics, ethics and teamwork to the profession.  

Admission Requirements: 

Applicants to the M.S. program in EE must hold a B.S degree in Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering or equivalent from an accredited university, with a GPA not less than 2.5 / 4.00 or equivalent, in addition to the general requirements set by the Deanship of Graduate Studies at KFUPM. 

Degree Plan:

Based on the committee's analysis of the current structure, benchmarking, input from Industrial Advisory Board (IAB) and the graduate student survey, the committee proposes a revised program for the Master of Science in Telecommunication Engineering. The proposed program consists of 30 credit hours, of which 24 credit hours are of course work and 6 credit hours for thesis (EE 610). The course work must satisfy the following: 

All students are required to take the following core courses

  • ​EE 570   Stochastic Processes
  • EE 571 Digital Communication I
  • EE 573 Digital Communication II OR EE 577 Wireless Communications
  • COE 540 Computer Communications Network
  • MIS 502 Management Information Systems OR MIS 510 Information Resource Management 
  • Seminar Course (EE 599)
A total of 9 credit hours of technical electives in the area of communications and related areas, from a pool of designated EE courses and non-EE courses,  approved by EE department. Student looking to take other courses must seek the approval of the EE department first. 

The following table depicts a typical degree plan. 

#

Title

LT

LB

CR

First Semester

EE 570

Stochastic Processes

3

0

3

EE 571

Digital Communications I

3

0

3

COE 540

Computer Networks

3

0

3

 

9

0

9

Second Semester

EE 573 / EE577

Digital Communications II /

3

0

3

Wireless and Personal Communications

XX xxx

Technical Elective[1]

3

0

3

XX xxx

Technical Elective

3

0

3

EE 599

Seminar

1

0

0

 

10

0

9

Third Semester

XX xxx

Technical Elective

3

0

3

MIS 502/510

Management of Information Systems /

3

0

3

Information Resource Management

EE 610

M.S. Thesis

0

0

IP

 

6

0

6

Fourth Semester

EE 610

M.S. Thesis

0

0

6

 

0

0

6

Total Credit Hours

30



​List of Courses 

In the process of revision, the department relevant groups were requested to revise all course description and provide any modification for the existing description. Also, the groups were requested to add new courses and delete any obsolete ones. As a result, the courses in the revised program are:

EE Courses

  • ​​EE 532 Antenna Theory and Applications
  • EE 562 Digital Signal Processing I
  • EE 563 Speech and Audio Processing
  • EE 570 Stochastic Processes         
  • EE 571 Digital Communications I 
  • EE 573 Digital Communications II
  • EE 574 Detection and Estimation
  • EE 575 Information Theory
  • EE 576 Error Control Coding
  • EE 577 Wireless and Personal Communications
  • EE 578 Simulation of Communication Systems
  • EE 599 Seminar
  • EE 606 Independent Research
  • EE 608 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering – I
  • EE 609 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering – II
  • EE 610 M.S. Thesis
  • EE 633 Optical Fiber Communication
  • EE 636 Theory and Applications of Antenna Arrays 
  • EE 662 Adaptive Filtering and Applications
  • EE 663 Image Processing
  • EE 665 Signal and Image Compression
  • EE 677 Advanced Wireless Communications
  • EE 679 Special Topics in Communication

Non-EE Courses Approved as electives:
  • COE 541 Local and Metropolitan Networks
  • COE 551 Computer and Network Security
  • COE 555 Protocol Engineering
  • ICS 555 Data Security and Encryption
  • ICS 583 Pattern Recognition 

Non-Technical Electives
  • MIS 502 Management Information System
  • MIS 510 Information Ressource Management
 
Course Descriptions:

EE 532 Antenna Theory and Applications (3-0-3)

Properties and characteristics of antennas. Polynomial representation of linear arrays. Pattern synthesis. Chebyshev array distributions. Thin linear antennas. Microstrip radiators and arrays. Huygen's principle. Radiation from apertures. Reflector type antennas. Frequency independent antennas. Reciprocity theorem and receiving antennas. Radar antennas. Antenna measurements.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 562   Digital Signal Processing I   (3-0-3)

Classification of discrete-time signals and systems. Basic and lattice structures, Finite-word length effects. Discrete Fourier Transform and its efficient implementations. Introduction to spectral analysis. FIR and IIR filter design techniques: Windowing techniques, Analog-to-Digital transformation techniques, Computer-aided design techniques.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing (cross-listed with SCE 534)

EE 563   Speech and Audio Processing    (3-0-3)

Speech analysis, Digital processing of wave forms, Wavelet transformation Waveform coding, Parametric coding of speech: linear predictive coding, Text-to-Speech synthesis, Recognition, Stochastic modeling of speech signals, Pattern recognition and its application to speech, Speech coding for Packet Networks, Echo removal.

Prerequisite: EE 562 

EE 570 Stochastic Processes (3-0-3)

Basic set theory and measure theory, probability spaces, joint probability, conditional probabil­ity, and independence. Random variables, distribution functions, and moments. Multiple random variables, convergence concepts, and mean square estimation. Stochastic processes, stationarity and ergodicity, second-order processes, and systems with random inputs. Markov processes. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

EE 571 Digital Communications I (3-0-3)

Review of probability and random processes. Space representation of signals. Optimal detection of signals in Gaussian noise. Matched filter and correlator receivers. Band-pass modulation techniques. Error performance of binary and M-ary modulation techniques. Spectral density and autocorrelation of digital signals. Differential modulation and non-coherent receivers. Introduction to source coding, channel capacity and error control coding. Linear block codes and convolutional codes.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

EE 573 Digital Communications II (3-0-3)

Review of digital transmission over AWGN channels. Spectral analysis of digital signals. Digital, transmission over band-limited channels. Intersymbol lnterference. Signal design for band-limited channels. Channel equalization. Characterization of fading multipath channels. Performance of digital transmission over fading channels. Diversity techniques. Spread spectrum. Multi-user communication. Multi-channel and multicarrier systems, introduction to MIMO systems. 

Prerequisite: EE 571

EE 574 Detection and Estimation (3-0-3)

Binary and M-hypotheses Detection techniques: Maximum likelihood, Newman Pearson, Minimum probability of error, Maximum a posteriori probability, Bayes decision and minimax detection. Parameter estimation: weighted least squares, BLUE, Maximum likelihood, Mean square estimation. Signal estimation and filtering: Wiener filtering, Kalman filtering and estimation. Simultaneous detection and estimation. Application to system identification and communication systems.

Prerequisite: EE 570

EE 575 Information Theory (3-0-3)

Measures of information, entropy, source coding theorem, lossless data compression, Huffman codes and Lempel-Ziv codes, sources with memory, lossy data compression, rate distortion theory, mutual information, memoryless channels, channel capacity, channel coding theory, differential entropy, capacity of AWGN channels, multiple access channels if time permits.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

EE 576 Error Control Coding(3-0-3)

Finite field arithmetic, Linear codes, Block codes, Cyclic codes, BCH and Reed-Solomon codes, Encoding and decoding methods, Performance analysis of block and cyclic codes, Convolutional codes, Trellis representation, The Viterbi algorithm, Performance analysis of convolutional codes, Coded modulation, Turbo codes.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 577 Wireless and Personal Communications (3-0-3)

The Cellular concept, Propagation modeling, Digital transmission techniques, multiple access techniques, Cellular frequency planning, Link control, Handoffs, Power control, Traffic capacity, Wireless networking, Privacy and security of wireless systems, Examples of current wireless systems standards.

Prerequisite: EE 571

EE 578 Simulation of Communication Systems (3-0-3)

Generation of pseudo-random signals and noise, Basic techniques for bit error rate estimation, Simulation of a binary system, Simulation of Intersymbol interference, Channel modeling, Signal-to-Noise Ratio estimation, Multi-rate simulation, Adaptive equalization and Coded systems simulation, Importance sampling.

Prerequisite: EE 573

EE 599 Seminar (1-0-0)

This course requires attending the seminars given by faculty, visiting scholars, and fellow graduate students. Among other things, this course is designed to give the student an overview of research in the department, and a familiarity with the research methodology, journals and professional societies in his discipline. Graded on a Pass or Fail basis.

Prerequisite:  Open only to Master of Science students. 

EE 606 Independent Research  (0-0-3)

This course is intended to allow the student to conduct research in advanced problems in his M.S. research area. The faculty offering the course should submit a research plan to be approved by the Graduate Program Committee at the academic department. The student is expected to deliver a public seminar and a report on his research outcomes at the end of the course. Graded on a Pass or Fail basis. 

Prerequisite: Prior arrangement with an instructor. Only open to Master of Science students. 

EE 608 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering - I  (3-0-3)

The contents of this course will be in one of the specialized areas of Electrical Engineering. The specific contents of the special topics of course will be given in detail at least one semester in advance of that in which it is offered. 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor

EE 609 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering - II (3-0-3)

The contents of this course will be in one of the specialized areas of Electrical Engineering. The specific contents of the special topics of course will be given in detail at least one semester in advance of that in which it is offered. 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor

EE 610 M.S. Thesis  (0-0-6)

Prerequisite: EE 599

EE 633 Optical Fiber Communication  (3-0-3)

Dielectric slab waveguides. Classification of mode types. Parabolic two-dimensional media. Circular waveguides. Step-index and graded-index optical fibers. Effect of loss. Dispersion effects. Fabrication methods in integrated optics and optical fibers. Light sources. Light Detectors. WDM concepts and components. Optical Amplifiers. Point-to-point link system considerations. Photonic devices. Applications in communication systems.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 636 Theory and Applications of Antenna Arrays  (3-0-3)
 
Antenna array fundamentals. Analysis and synthesis of discrete linear arrays. Two-dimensional arrays. Concept of adaptive arrays. Adaptive beam forming and nulling. Superdirective array functions. Suppression of side lobes in linear arrays.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 662   Adaptive Filtering and Applications    (3-0-3)

Introduction to adaptive Signal Processing.  Fundamentals of Adaptive Filter Theory.  The LMS Algorithm, LMS-based Algorithms.  Conventional RLS Adaptive Filtering.  Adaptive Lattice-based RLS Algorithms.  Fast Algorithms.  Implementation Issues.  Adaptive IIR filters.  HOS-based adaptive filtering.  Introduction to nonlinear filtering.  Applications to Echo cancellation, equalization, noise canceling and prediction.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 663   Image Processing      (3-0-3)

Two-dimensional systems and mathematical preliminaries. Perception and human vision systems. Sampling and quantization. Image transforms. Image representation by stochastic models. Image data compression, enhancement, filtering, and restoration. Reconstruction from projection. Analysis and computer vision.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

EE 665 Signal and Image Compression      (3-0-3)

Principles and techniques of signal compression, Quantization theory, Linear prediction, Coding techniques: predictive, transform, entropy, and vector quantization, Fidelity, bit-rate, and complexity trade-offs. Compression standards, Applications to speech, audio, image, and video compression.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 677 Advanced Wireless Communications  (3-0-3)
Review of propagation models, modulation, and diversity for second-generation systems. Information theoretic capacity of fading channels: ergodic and outage capacity. Single-user MIMO systems: channel models, capacity, and trans-receive schemes. Introduction to multiuser information theoretic models: Multiple Access, Broadcast, and Interference channels. Multiuser-user MIMO systems: trans-receive schemes and capacity results. Multi-user scheduling and multi-user diversity. Introduction to Cognitive radio. Cooperative communications. Ad hoc networks. Future and open research topics.

Prerequisite: EE 577

EE 679 Special Topics in Communication  (3-0-3)

The contents of this course will be in one of the areas of interest in communication. The specific contents of the special topics of course will be given in detail at least one semester in advance of that in which it is offered. 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor