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 Revised Ph.D Program


Introduction:

The Electrical Engineering (EE) department is the first department at KFUPM to host graduate programs. The department is currently offering degrees of Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in six specializations: Energy, Electromagnetics, Electronics, Control, Communications and Signal Processing. It also offers a Master of Science degree in Telecommunication Engineering. The number of graduate students constitutes more than 15% of the department student population, the majority of which are international students.

The department has a policy of periodically reviewing its graduate programs in order to guarantee their relevance to the latest and upcoming developments and trends in the field of electrical engineering. The task of revision of the current graduate programs was assigned to the Graduate Program Revision Committee (GPRC). The GPRC comprises representative faculty members from each research group in the department. The committee held regular meetings to discuss various issues related to the revision, and sought continuous input through:

  • ​Expertise of the six research groups/specializations in the department.
  • Survey of a selected set of top American universities that are known of excellence in EE programs.
  • Consultation of the Industrial Advisory Board (IAB) of the department.
  • Feedback from graduate students, alumni and employers.

Programs Need Analysis: 

The Ph.D. program in EE has been offered since 1983. The program has always been popular and attracting increased number of students both from KSA and abroad. They come from reputable universities worldwide. The criteria for admission to the program are highly selective. At the time of preparing this report there are around 40 students enrolled in the program.
This revision comes out of a routine exercise that KFUPM requires for all programs to ensure currency and continuous compliance with national needs and international standards. The revision resulted in restructuring the course work, adding new courses, deleting obsolete courses, and revising the contents of a large number of existing courses.
The revised program was sent to external and internal reviewers for evaluation. We received four external reviews and four internal reviews.  Reviewers comments were studied and incorporated as appropriate.

Program Objectives:

The program leading to the degree of Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering provides an opportunity for the students to pursue advanced studies in a particular field of major interest and an opportunity to engage in research.

The specific objectives of the Ph.D. in EE program are to:

Perform original leading edge research. Acquaint knowledge on the state-of-the art technologies in electrical engineering disciplines. Contribute to the advancement of scientific body of knowledge in engineering and related fields.Develop leadership, skills and ethics of the profession. 
The program objectives are strongly aligned to the university mission that indicates commitment to "graduating leaders who are knowledgeable, skillful, and productive" as well as "creating new knowledge that makes a scholarly impact, provides innovative solutions, and contributes to the national economy". The objectives emphasize original leading edge research, advancement of knowledge, profession skills and leadership.  

Program Learning Outcomes:

The graduates of this program should be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes.  

  • ​Master the knowledge of electrical engineering concepts. 
  • Conduct research independently and collaboratively. 
  • Formulate problems and plan a procedure for solution. 
  • Communicate, organize and present information effectively. 
  • Pursue advanced studies and lifelong learning. 
  • Realize the relevance of economics, ethics and teamwork to the profession.  
 
​Admission Requirements: 

Applicants to the Ph.D. program in EE must hold an M.S. degree in electrical engineering or related fields from an accredited university, with a GPA not less than 3.00 / 4.00 or equivalent, in addition to the general requirements set by the Deanship of Graduate Studies at KFUPM. 

Degree Plan:

Based on the committee's analysis of the current structure, benchmarking, input from Industrial Advisory Board (IAB) and the graduate student survey, the committee proposes a revised program for the Ph.D. in EE. The proposed program consists of 42 credit hours, of which 30 credit hours are of course work and 12 credit hours for thesis dissertation (EE 711 and EE 712). The course work must satisfy the following: 

  • ​A minimum of 9 credit hours of letter-grade courses in the "major" area of EE (the area of specialization of the student).
  • A minimum of 6 credit hours of letter-grade courses in one "minor" area of EE. 
  • A minimum of 6 and a maximum of 12 credit hours of non-EE (letter-grade) courses (at MOST one non-technical)
  • Seminar Course (EE 699)
The condition of letter-grade courses excludes the counting of PASS/FAIL courses towards the minimum requirements in any category.  A student may declare a minor outside EE under justification. Technical non-EE courses must be taken from the following colleges: College of Engineering Sciences, College of Sciences, College of Computer Science & Engineering, and College of Petroleum Engineering & Geosciences. Exceptions require the approval of the EE department.

The following table depicts a typical degree plan. 
 
Course # Title LT LB CR
First Semester
EE xxx Course in the Major area 3 0 3
EE xxx Course in the Major area 3 0 3
EE xxx Course in the Minor area 3 0 3
  9 0 9
Second Semester
EE xxx Course in the Major area 3 0 3
EE xxx Course in the Minor area 3 0 3
XX xxx Non-EE Technical Elective 3 0 3
  9 0 9
Third Semester
XX xxx Non-EE Technical Elective 3 0 3
XX xxx Free Technical Elective 3 0 3
XX xxx Free Elective 3 0 3
EE 699 Seminar 1 0 0
  10 0 9
Fourth Semester
EE 711 Ph.D. Pre-Dissertation 0 0 3
XX xxx Free Technical Elective 3 0 3
   3 0 6
Fifth Semester
EE 712 Ph.D. Dissertation  0 0 IP
Sixth Semester
EE 712 Ph.D. Dissertation  0 0 9
   0 0 9
Total Credit Hours42​


List of Courses: 

In the process of revision, the department groups were requested to revise all course description and provide any modification for the existing description. Also, the groups were requested to add new courses and delete any obsolete ones. As a result, the courses in the revised program are:

  • EE 520 Power System Steady State Analysis
  • EE 522 Power System Dynamic Analysis
  • EE 523 Analysis and control of Electrical Machines
  • EE 524 Bulk Power System Planning       
  • EE 525 Transmission of Electrical Energy
  • EE 526 Sustainable Energy
  • EE 527 Reliability Assessment of Power Systems            
  • EE 528 Advanced Power Electronics 
  • EE 530 Radiation and Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves 
  • EE 531 Applied Electromagnetic Theory
  • EE 532 Antenna Theory and Applications
  • EE 533 Microwave Integrated Circuits 
  • EE 541 Design of Digital Systems
  • EE 542 Analog Integrated Circuit Design
  • EE 543 Computer System Architecture 
  • EE 544 Embedded System Design and Applications
  • EE 545 Advanced Analog Electronics
  • EE 546 Semiconductor Device Theory
  • EE 550 Linear Control Systems
  • EE 551 System Identification
  • EE 552 Optimal Control Theory and Applications
  • EE 554 Advanced Digital Control Systems
  • EE 555 Neural Networks Theory and Applications
  • EE 556 Intelligent Control
  • EE 562 Digital Signal Processing I
  • EE 563 Speech and Audio Processing
  • EE 570 Stochastic Processes         
  • EE 571 Digital Communications I 
  • EE 573 Digital Communications II
  • EE 574 Detection and Estimation
  • EE 575 Information Theory
  • EE 576 Error Control Coding
  • EE 577 Wireless and Personal Communications
  • EE 578 Simulation of Communication Systems
  • EE 608 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering – I
  • EE 609 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering – II
  • EE 620 High Voltage Engineering
  • EE 622 Power System Operation
  • EE 623 HVDC Transmission System
  • EE 624 Smart Grids
  • EE 625 Power System Protection
  • EE 629 Special Topics in Power Systems
  • EE 631 Microwave Measurements
  • EE 633 Optical Fiber Communication
  • EE 635 Computational Electromagnetics
  • EE 636 Theory and Applications of Antenna Arrays 
  • EE 639 Special Topics in Electromagnetics
  • EE 642 Analog VLSI Circuit Design
  • EE 645 VLSI Architecture
  • EE 649 Special Topics in Digital Systems and Electronics
  • EE 651 Adaptive Control
  • EE 652 Nonlinear Systems           
  • EE 653 Robust Control
  • EE 654 Large Scale Systems
  • EE 656 Robotics & Control
  • EE 659 Special Topics in Control
  • EE 661 Digital Signal Processing II
  • EE 662 Adaptive Filtering and Applications
  • EE 663 Image Processing
  • EE 664 Wavelet Signal Processing
  • EE 665 Signal and Image Compression
  • EE 669 Special Topics in Signal Processing
  • EE 677 Advanced Wireless Communications
  • EE 679 Special Topics in Communication
  • EE 699 Seminar
  • EE 701 Directed Research I
  • EE 702 Directed Research II
  • EE 711 Ph.D. Pre-Dissertation
  • EE 712 Ph.D. Dissertation
 
​Course Descriptions:

EE 520 Power System Steady State Analysis            (3-0-3)

Steady state modeling and simulation techniques. Large-scale power systems. Sparsity programming. Short-circuit and load-flow studies. Introduction to transient stability. Introduction to state estimation.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 522 Power System Dynamic Analysis      (3-0-3)

Dynamic model of synchronous machines. Excitation and governor systems. Nonlinear and linear modeling of single machine infinite bus systems. Stability analysis and control design. Direct method of stability determination. Multimachine system modeling. Power system dynamic equivalents.

Prerequisite: EE 520 

EE 523 Analysis and control of Electrical Machines            (3-0-3)

Steady-state and dynamic analysis of electrical machines: direct and quadrature axis transformation. Linear and nonlinear state space representation. Regulation and control devices. Simulation of electromechanical subsystems.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 524 Bulk Power System Planning (3-0-3)

Mathematical methods and modern approaches to power system planning. Demand forecasting. Generation system planning: deterministic and probabilistic methods. Transmission system planning: heuristic and stochastic methods. Optimization methods for transmission planning. Route selection: environmental and other considerations.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

EE 525 Transmission of Electrical Energy   (3-0-3)

Introduction to power system transients. Transmission lines/cable parameters, Propagation on loss-free lines, effects of termination and junctions. Transform methods of solution of T.L. Laplace transform and Fourier transform. Transients on T.L., potential and current distribution: standing waves. Traveling wave method: Lattice and graphical methods. Lighting and switching applications. Voltage limitation on power-handling capacity and T.L. effects. Transmission system protection.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

EE 526 Sustainable Energy    (3-0-3)

This course will provide a thorough understanding of the fundamentals of the sustainable energy sources. The topics that will be included and discussed in this course include: solar energy, wind energy, fuel cell, integration of the renewable energy sources, renewable energy sources control, and impact of the renewable energy sources on power system operation, power flow control, and power system stability.  This course will also discuss the various sustainable energy technologies. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

EE 527 Reliability Assessment of Power Systems     (3-0-3)

Distribution system reliability: the system average interruption duration index (SAIDI) and the system average interruption frequency index (SAIFI). Concept and characteristics of the reliability and availability of the power distribution systems. Analytical and simulation techniques. Assessment of reliability of the basic and networked power distribution systems. Integration of both the conventional and renewable distributed generation into the reliability models.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

EE 528 Advanced Power Electronics            (3-0-3)

Review of power semiconductor devices: thyristors, GTO, power transistor, and MOSFET. Converter analysis, design, modeling, and control of switching converters will be presented as relevant to different applications. Practical design issues such as snubbers, gate drives and thermal design. Web content, computer analysis, and simulation tools such as Matlab and Pspice will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

EE 530 Radiation and Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves       (3-0-3)

Review of Maxwell's equations, Constitutive Relations, Boundary Conditions, Power and Energy, Time Harmonic Fields, Electrical Properties of Matters, Wave Equation and its Solutions, Wave Propagation and Polarization, Electromagnetic Waves in Lossless, Lossy and Good Conductors Media, Waves at Plane Boundaries: Reflection and Transmission, Normal and Oblique Incidences, Single and Multilayers, Guided Waves Principles, Dielectric Waveguide Propagation, Rectangular Cross-Section Waveguides, Applications

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

EE 531 Applied Electromagnetic Theory      (3-0-3)

Analytical solution of the wave equation in Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems. Applications to common boundary value problems (guidance, resonance, scattering and radiation). Perturbational and variational techniques. Numerical formulation and solution of selected boundary value problems.

Prerequisite: EE 530

EE 532 Antenna Theory and Applications    (3-0-3)

Properties and characteristics of antennas. Polynomial representation of linear arrays. Pattern synthesis. Chebyshev array distributions. Thin linear antennas. Microstrip radiators and arrays. Huygen's principle. Radiation from apertures. Reflector type antennas. Frequency independent antennas. Reciprocity theorem and receiving antennas. Radar antennas. Antenna measurements.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 533 Microwave Integrated Circuits        (3-0-3)

Overview of microwave circuits technologies (MIC, MHMIC, MMIC). Modulation, transmitters and receivers. Antenna, RF link, and RF systems. Transmission line structures. Analysis of microstrip lines. Microwave network analysis. Passive components (termination and attenuators, hybrids, combiners, splitters, couplers, filters, ...). Active components (small-signal amplifiers, power amplifiers, oscillators, mixers, diodes, ...). TR modules. Modern microwave measurements (S-parameters, spectrum analysis, power meters, load-pull, vector signal analysis).

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

EE 541   Design of Digital Systems    (3-0-3)

Conventional and non-conventional number systems and their applications. Hardware organization of digital systems. Arithmetic and logic units: high-speed addition, multiplication and division algorithms and implementation. Use of a Hardware Description Language (Verilog-HDL) to design complete digital systems and FPGA implementation. Transistor Level design of basic digital systems. Introduction to High Speed Digital Design and Signal Integrity.

Prerequisite:  Graduate Standing (cross listed with COE 561) 

EE 542 Analog Integrated Circuit Design     (3-0-3)

Review of device-level models. Basic equations and higher-order effects. Basic building blocks of bipolar, MOS and CMOS analog circuits: current mirrors, differential pairs, level-shift stages, gain stages, references and Op-Amp circuits. The translinear principle and applications. Typical examples of IC amplifier design.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 543 Computer System Architecture        (3-0-3)

Architectural techniques for advanced and high performance microprocessors including CPU architecture, pipelining, in-order and out-of-order superscalar architecture, memory hierarchy, and VLIW machines. Power management. Advanced I/O systems. Parallel architectures. Fundamentals of multiprocessors: multithreading and multi-core. System performance trade-offs and optimization techniques.

Prerequisite: EE 541 (cross-listed with COE 501)

EE 544 Embedded System Design and Applications (3-0-3)

Microprocessors, Microcontrollers and DSP hardware and software architectures. Advanced programming and interrupts. Interface to real-time systems. Applications and case studies including projects

Prerequisite: EE 541

EE 545 Advanced Analog Electronics           (3-0-3)

Small-signal equivalent circuits and noise models of active devices. Design and analysis of linear wide-band low-noise feedback amplifiers. High frequency design using operational amplifiers and operational transconductance amplifiers. Application of specialized electronic systems in analog signal processors. Introduction to emerging technologies and advanced topics from recent literature.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 546 Semiconductor Device Theory          (3-0-3)

Electronic states in semiconductors. Carrier transport models and current equations. Analysis of pn junctions, bipolar and FET transistors. Introduction to microwave devices and semiconductor optoelectronics.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 550 Linear Control Systems        (3-0-3)

State space representation of systems. Theory of multivariable systems. Jordan canonical forms. Transformation matrices. Realization theory. Controllability and observability. Stability. State estimators. Output and state feedback. Compensation. Decoupling and model matching. Introduction to optimal control.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing (cross-listed with SCE 507)

EE 551 System Identification             (3-0-3)

Introduction to dynamic systems, models, and identification process. Models of linear time-invariant systems. Models of time-varying and nonlinear systems. Parametric estimation methods. Convergence and consistency of solutions. Asymptotic distribution. Recursive and non-recursive computation methods. Model selection and validation.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing (cross listed with SCE 513)

EE 552 Optimal Control Theory and Applications   (3-0-3)

Nonlinear optimal control of continuous-time systems. Minimum time and constrained input problems. Linear quadratic regulator. Optimal output-feedback. Optimal state estimation. Linear quadratic Gaussian design. Case studies.

Prerequisite: EE 550 or equivalent (cross listed with SCE 514)

EE 554 Advanced Digital Control Systems   (3-0-3)

Digital controller design. Pole-assignment design and state-estimation. Linear quadratic optimal control. Sampled-data transformation of Analog filters. Digital filter structures. Microcomputer implementation of digital filters.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 555 Neural Networks Theory and Applications (3-0-3)

Introduction, background and biological inspiration. Survey of fundamentals methods of artificial neural networks: single and multi-layer networks; Perceptions and back propagation. Associative memory and statistical networks. Supervised and unsupervised learning. Merits and limitations of neural networks. Applications.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing (cross listed with ICS 586) 

EE 556 Intelligent Control     (3-0-3)

Intelligent control strategies: Expert systems, Fuzzy logic control, Neural networks. Optimization control techniques: genetic algorithms, simulated annealing, tabu search. Hybrid systems. Applications

Prerequisite: Graduate standing (cross-listed with SCE 562)

EE 562 Digital Signal Processing I   (3-0-3)

Classification of discrete-time signals and systems. Basic and lattice structures, Finite-word length effects. Discrete Fourier Transform and its efficient implementations. Introduction to spectral analysis. FIR and IIR filter design techniques: Windowing techniques, Analog-to-Digital transformation techniques, Computer-aided design techniques.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing (cross-listed with SCE 534)

EE 563 Speech and Audio Processing             (3-0-3)

Speech analysis, Digital processing of wave forms, Wavelet transformation Waveform coding, Parametric coding of speech: linear predictive coding, Text-to-Speech synthesis, Recognition, Stochastic modeling of speech signals, Pattern recognition and its application to speech, Speech coding for Packet Networks, Echo removal.

Prerequisite: EE 562 or equivalent 

EE 570 Stochastic Processes (3-0-3)

Basic set theory and measure theory, probability spaces, joint probability, conditional probabil­ity, and independence. Random variables, distribution functions, and moments. Multiple random variables, convergence concepts, and mean square estimation. Stochastic processes, stationarity and ergodicity, second-order processes, and systems with random inputs. Markov processes. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

EE 571 Digital Communications I     (3-0-3)

Review of probability and random processes. Space representation of signals. Optimal detection of signals in Gaussian noise. Matched filter and correlator receivers. Band-pass modulation techniques. Error performance of binary and M-ary modulation techniques. Spectral density and autocorrelation of digital signals. Differential modulation and non-coherent receivers. Introduction to source coding, channel capacity and error control coding. Linear block codes and convolutional codes.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

EE 573 Digital Communications II    (3-0-3)

Review of digital transmission over AWGN channels. Spectral analysis of digital signals. Digital, transmission over band-limited channels. Intersymbol lnterference. Signal design for band-limited channels. Channel equalization. Characterization of fading multipath channels. Performance of digital transmission over fading channels. Diversity techniques. Spread spectrum. Multi-user communication. Multi-channel and multicarrier systems, introduction to MIMO systems. 

Prerequisite: EE 571

EE 574 Detection and Estimation      (3-0-3)

Binary and M-hypotheses Detection techniques: Maximum likelihood, Newman Pearson, Minimum probability of error, Maximum a posteriori probability, Bayes decision and minimax detection. Parameter estimation: weighted least squares, BLUE, Maximum likelihood, Mean square estimation. Signal estimation and filtering: Wiener filtering, Kalman filtering and estimation. Simultaneous detection and estimation. Application to system identification and communication systems.

Prerequisite: EE 570

EE 575 Information Theory (3-0-3)

Measures of information, entropy, source coding theorem, lossless data compression, Huffman codes and Lempel-Ziv codes, sources with memory, lossy data compression, rate distortion theory, mutual information, memoryless channels, channel capacity, channel coding theory, differential entropy, capacity of AWGN channels, multiple access channels if time permits.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

EE 576 Error Control Coding           (3-0-3)

Finite field arithmetic, Linear codes, Block codes, Cyclic codes, BCH and Reed-Solomon codes, Encoding and decoding methods, Performance analysis of block and cyclic codes, Convolutional codes, Trellis representation, The Viterbi algorithm, Performance analysis of convolutional codes, Coded modulation, Turbo codes.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 577 Wireless and Personal Communications       (3-0-3)

The Cellular concept, Propagation modeling, Digital transmission techniques, multiple access techniques, Cellular frequency planning, Link control, Handoffs, Power control, Traffic capacity, Wireless networking, Privacy and security of wireless systems, Examples of current wireless systems standards.

Prerequisite: EE 571

EE 578 Simulation of Communication Systems         (3-0-3)

Generation of pseudo-random signals and noise, Basic techniques for bit error rate estimation, Simulation of a binary system, Simulation of Intersymbol interference, Channel modeling, Signal-to-Noise Ratio estimation, Multi-rate simulation, Adaptive equalization and Coded systems simulation, Importance sampling.

Prerequisite: EE 573

EE 608 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering - I  (3-0-3)

The contents of this course will be in one of the specialized areas of Electrical Engineering. The specific contents of the special topics of course will be given in detail at least one semester in advance of that in which it is offered. 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor

EE 609 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering - II            (3-0-3)

The contents of this course will be in one of the specialized areas of Electrical Engineering. The specific contents of the special topics of course will be given in detail at least one semester in advance of that in which it is offered. 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor

EE 620 High Voltage Engineering     (3-0-3)

Breakdown in gases, solids and liquids. Analysis of high voltage transmission: switching and lighting surges. Insulation coordination in electrical power system. Basic impulse levels. System grounding and insulation designs. High voltage generation and measurement.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 622 Power System Operation      (3-0-3)

This course covers the fundamentals of power system economics. Background concepts on optimization and power system operation are discussed. Then, the structure and operation of deregulated electricity markets taking into account the behavior of the physical system is discussed thoroughly. 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 623 HVDC Transmission System             (3-0-3)

Development of HVDC technology Comparison between AC and DC transmission. Converter circuit configuration. Converter operation and analysis. Harmonics and filters. Ground return. Integration of HVDC links into power systems. AC-DC load flow, short circuit and stability calculations. FACTS devices and system operation. Trends for HVDC applications: wind farm and IGBT technology.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

EE 624 Smart Grids   (3-0-3)

This course will provide a thorough understanding of the fundamentals of the smart grid, microgrids, and distributed generation (DG). The topics that will be included and discussed in this course include: Distribution system basics, DG integration, unbalanced power flow including DG, electricity markets, smart meters, electric vehicles and storage integration, reliability and self-healing of microgrids.  This course will also discuss the various demand side management (DSM) programs and technologies.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

EE 625 Power System Protection      (3-0-3)

This course is dedicated to the fundamentals of power system protection concepts and applications. The course cover the analysis of symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults on power systems, Study of protective relaying for protection of power systems components against faults, Digital relays, and relay coordination and computer solutions are emphasized.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

EE 629 Special Topics in Power Systems      (3-0-3)

The contents of this course will be in one of the areas of interest in power systems. The specific contents of the special topics course will be given in detail at least one semester in advance of that in which it is offered.

Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor.

EE 631 Microwave Measurements    (1-6-3)

Microwave signal sources. Waveguide components. Network analyzer measurements. Scattering parameters of microwave planar transistors. Doppler effect. Time domain reflectometry. Microwave links. Antenna impedance and pattern measurements. Microstrip transmission lines. Resonant cavities.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 633 Optical Fiber Communication           (3-0-3)

Dielectric slab waveguides. Classification of mode types. Parabolic two-dimensional media. Circular waveguides. Step-index and graded-index optical fibers. Effect of loss. Dispersion effects. Fabrication methods in integrated optics and optical fibers. Light sources. Light Detectors. WDM concepts and components. Optical Amplifiers. Point-to-point link system considerations. Photonic devices. Applications in communication systems.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 635 Computational Electromagnetics      (3-0-3)

Review of basic electromagnetic theory and partial differential equations (PDEs). Finite-difference approximation of PDEs. The finite-difference time domain (FDTD) in 2D and 3D. The Yee's mesh. Scalar formulation of the FDTD method. Related topics including numerical stability and dispersion, boundary conditions, materials,etc. Introduction to other methods such as the finite-element method, the method of lines, beam propagation method, and the method of moments. Applications and case studies.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

EE 636 Theory and Applications of Antenna Arrays           (3-0-3)

Antenna array fundamentals. Analysis and synthesis of discrete linear arrays. Two-dimensional arrays. Concept of adaptive arrays. Adaptive beam forming and nulling. Superdirective array functions. Suppression of side lobes in linear arrays.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 639 Special Topics in Electromagnetics   (3-0-3)

The contents of this course will be in one of the areas of interest in electromagnetics. The specific contents of the special topics of course will be given in detail at least one semester in advance of that in which it is offered. 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor

EE 642 Analog VLSI Circuit Design             (3-0-3)

MOS and CMOS technology: building blocks, devices, capacitors and limitations. Operational amplifiers and other analog systems. Application to filter design and data converters. Layout considerations and CAD tools.

Prerequisite: EE 542

EE 645 VLSI Architecture     (3-0-3)

Review of MOS transistors: fabrication, layout and characterization. Review of CMOS circuit and logic design: fully complementary CMOS logic, pseudo-NMOS logic, dynamic CMOS logic, pass-transistor logic, clocking strategies. Subsystem design: ALUs, multipliers, memories, PLAs. Architecture design: iterative cellular design and systolic arrays. Application to system level designs.

Prerequisite: EE 541

EE 649 Special Topics in Digital Systems and Electronics    (3-0-3)

The contents of this course will be in one of the areas that has the nature of research topics in digital and electronics systems. For example: VLSI architectures, Advanced analog ICs, Physics of ultra small devices, etc.

Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor

EE 651 Adaptive Control       (3-0-3)

Introduction to the various approaches of adaptive controller design. Real-time parameter estimation. Model reference adaptive control. Self-tuning controllers. Variable structure systems. Gain Scheduling. Robustness issues. Practical aspects and implementation. Typical Industrial applications.

Prerequisite: EE 550 or equivalent (cross listed with SCE 527)

EE 652 Nonlinear Systems     (3-0-3)

Introduction to nonlinear systems and control. Overview of phase plane analysis, describing function and limit cycles. Linear systems and linearization. Lyapunov stability, Invariance principal, different notions of stability (uniform, uniform asymptotic, exponential, global uniform asymptotic), input-output stability, Input-to-State-Stability (ISS), region of attraction. Invariance Theorems. System linearization by state transformation and feedback, partial linearization, zero dynamics. Back-stepping method.

Prerequisite: EE 550 or equivalent (cross listed with SCE 517)

EE 653 Robust Control          (3-0-3)

Elements of robust control theory. Norms of signals and systems. Performance specifications. Modeling of uncertain linear systems and system parameterization. Model uncertainty and robustness. Polytopic uncertainties and norm-bounded uncertainties. Domain stability, H∞ norm, and H2 norm. Linear matrix inequalities and their numerical solutions. Stability of uncertain linear systems in continuous time and discrete time. H∞ Filtering, Loop transfer recovery. H∞ Control, Mixed H2− H∞ control. Case studies.

Prerequisite: EE 550 (cross-listed with SCE 614)

EE 654 Large Scale Systems (3-0-3)

Introduction to large scale systems. Classical Model reduction techniques. Component cost analysis method. L2 model reduction. Hankel norm approximation. Introduction to H∞-model reduction. Relations between modeling and control. Closed loop model reduction. Decentralized control design schemes. System's interactions. Coordinated and hierarchical control. Case studies.

Prerequisite: EE 550 

EE 656 Robotics & Control   (3-0-3)

Basic concepts of robotics. Mathematical description of industrial manipulator. Homogeneous transformation and the Denavit-Hartenberg notation. Transformation between frames. Forward, and inverse kinematics and dynamics. Newton - Euler and Lagrange formulations. Joint space, and Cartesian space trajectories and dynamic control. Trajectory planning. Advance control schemes.

Prerequisite: EE 550 (cross-listed with SCE 571)

EE 659 Special Topics in Control      (3-0-3)

The contents of this course will be in one of the areas of interest in control. The specific contents of the special topics of course will be given in detail at least one semester in advance of that in which it is offered. 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor

EE 661   Digital Signal Processing II              (3-0-3)

Optimal one- dimensional filter design techniques.  Multidimensional digital signals and systems.  Multidimensional Fourier transform.  Analysis of multidimensional systems and digital filter design.  Implementation issues.  Parametric and non- parametric spectral estimation.  Applications

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 662 Adaptive Filtering and Applications             (3-0-3)

Introduction to adaptive Signal Processing.  Fundamentals of Adaptive Filter Theory.  The LMS Algorithm, LMS-based Algorithms.  Conventional RLS Adaptive Filtering.  Adaptive Lattice-based RLS Algorithms.  Fast Algorithms.  Implementation Issues.  Adaptive IIR filters.  HOS-based adaptive filtering.  Introduction to nonlinear filtering.  Applications to Echo cancellation, equalization, noise canceling and prediction.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 663 Image Processing     (3-0-3)

Two-dimensional systems and mathematical preliminaries. Perception and human vision systems. Sampling and quantization. Image transforms. Image representation by stochastic models. Image data compression, enhancement, filtering, and restoration. Reconstruction from projection. Analysis and computer vision.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

EE 664 Wavelet Signal Processing                (3-0-3)

Cosine transform and short-time Fourier transform, Analysis of filter banks and wavelets, Sub-band and wavelet coding, Multirate signal processing, Wavelet transform, Daubechies wavelets, Orthogonal and biorthogonal wavelets, Time-frequency and time-scale analysis, Design methods.  Applications of wavelets to audio and image compression, Medical imaging, Geophysics, Scientific visualization.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 665 Signal and Image Compression         (3-0-3)

Principles and techniques of signal compression, Quantization theory, Linear prediction, Coding techniques: predictive, transform, entropy, and vector quantization, Fidelity, bit-rate, and complexity trade-offs. Compression standards, Applications to speech, audio, image, and video compression.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EE 669 Special Topics in Signal Processing              (3-0-3)

The contents of this course will be in one of the areas of interest in signal processing. The specific contents of the special topics of course will be given in detail at least one semester in advance of that in which it is offered.

Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor

EE 677 Advanced Wireless Communications             (3-0-3)

Review of propagation models, modulation, and diversity for second-generation systems. Information theoretic capacity of fading channels: ergodic and outage capacity. Single-user MIMO systems: channel models, capacity, and trans-receive schemes. Introduction to multiuser information theoretic models: Multiple Access, Broadcast, and Interference channels. Multiuser-user MIMO systems: trans-receive schemes and capacity results. Multi-user scheduling and multi-user diversity. Introduction to Cognitive radio. Cooperative communications. Ad hoc networks. Future and open research topics.

Prerequisite: EE 577

EE 679 Special Topics in Communication     (3-0-3)

The contents of this course will be in one of the areas of interest in communication. The specific contents of the special topics of course will be given in detail at least one semester in advance of that in which it is offered.

Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor

EE 699 Seminar          (1-0-0)

This course requires attending the seminars given by faculty, visiting scholars, and fellow graduate students. Among other things, this course is designed to give the student an overview of research in the department, and a familiarity with the research methodology, journals and professional societies in his discipline. Graded on a Pass or Fail basis.

Prerequisite: Open only for PhD students

EE 701 Directed Research I  (0-0-3)

This course is intended to allow the student to conduct research in advanced problems in his Ph.D. research area. The faculty offering the course should submit a research plan to be approved by the Graduate Program Committee at the academic department. The student is expected to deliver a public seminar and a report on his research outcomes at the end of the course. Graded on a Pass or Fail basis. 

 Prerequisite: Prior arrangement with an instructor. 

EE 702 Directed Research II (0-0-3)

This course is intended to allow the student to conduct research in advanced problems in his Ph.D. research area. The faculty offering the course should submit a research plan to be approved by the Graduate Program Committee at the academic department. The student is expected to deliver a public seminar and a report on his research outcomes at the end of the course. Graded on a Pass or Fail basis. 

Prerequisite: EE 701 and prior arrangement with an instructor. 

EE 711 Ph.D. Pre-Dissertation          (0-0-3)

This course enables the student to submit his Ph.D. Dissertation Proposal and defends it in public. The student passes the course if the Ph.D. Dissertation committee accepts the submitted dissertation proposal report and upon successfully passing the Dissertation proposal public defense. The course grade can be NP, NF or IP.   

Prerequisite: Ph.D. candidacy and EE 699.  

EE 712 Ph.D. Dissertation     (0-0-9)

This course enables the student work on his Ph.D. Dissertation as per the submitted dissertation proposal, submit its final report and defend it in public. The student passes this course if the Ph.D. Dissertation committee accepts the submitted final dissertation report and upon successfully passing the Dissertation public defense. The course grade can be NP, NF or IP.   

Prerequisite: EE 711